Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Patrolman James H. Carroll

Lynn Police Department, Massachusetts

End of Watch Saturday, June 25, 1910

Leave a Reflection

Reflections for Patrolman James H. Carroll

One Hundred and Five years have now passed, but still your memory lives on.

God Bless.

Ptl. Jim Leahy, Jr.
Harvard University Police Dept.

June 25, 2015

Time may have passed but you are not forgotten. I believe as long as someone remembers you or speaks your name, you are still with us.
Thank you for your heroism.
GOD Bless

Detention Officer A.Zambito
Texas

June 25, 2015

Patrolman Carroll,
Sir, even though it's been over 103 years since your End of Watch you are still honored and remembered. I would just like to say thank you for your service and sacrifice for the citizens of Lynn.

R.I.P.
USBP

Anonymous
United States Border Patrol

September 9, 2013

To fully appreciate the heroes of the present, we must recognize our heroes of the past. Your heroism and service is honored today, the 102nd anniversary year of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer who was murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Time never diminishes respect. Your memory will always be honored and revered. Rest In Peace

Phyllis Loya
Mom of fallen California Officer Larry Lasater, Pittsburg PD, eow 4/24/05

November 14, 2012

On the 100th anniversary of Patrolman Carroll's death, we honored his service in our patrol briefing by reading his entry from ODMP. Each day, we honor one fallen officer on the anniversary of their death so as to keep them in our thoughts, and also to remind us of the dangers inherent in our job. Patrolman Carroll is not forgotten.

Sergeant Zach Perron
Palo Alto (CA) Police Department

June 26, 2010

Patrolman Carroll,
On today, the 98th anniversary of your murder, I would just like to say thank you for your service and sacrifice for the citizens of Lynn. It's nice to know at one time that the state of Massachusetts knew how to take of cop killers.

R.I.P.
Anonymous

Anonymous

June 25, 2008

Patrolman Carroll, today marks the 97th anniversary of your brutal murder. It bears some similarity to a crime which occurred just a few years later in my home town of Braintree. Sadly not all the scum responsible for your death received true justice here on Earth. We can only hope all faced it in the next world.

There was no need for these filthy animals to do what they did to you. You are a hero, they will forever be dirt.

God Bless and may you continue to Rest in Peace, Brother.

Ptl. Jim Leahy, Jr.
Harvard University Police Dept.

June 25, 2007

PRIDE INTEGIRTY & GUTS !

Some of you may know my face, but not my name. Most of you have seen me around the city and some have even met me, but not always under the best of circumstances. Some of you have even spoken to me on the phone, when you called me while I was working.

Most of you have an opinion on how my job should be done, but would never take my job if it was the last one on earth. And some of you who don’t even know me, hate me because of my job. But when I go to my job, I go to make a difference and so I can fight what everyone else fears.

When most would be running away from danger, my job requires me to run towards it. I do this in the hopes of making a difference for someone else I don’t even know. Most people say I make too much money, because my pay is published in the newspaper. But don’t think twice about hearing about another sports player sign a 20 million dollar contract for 6 months a year of playing a “game.”

Since my job’s base pay isn’t the best I must work extra to pay the bills. Including working extra shifts, on holidays and pick up side work at construction sites as well on my days off, most still complain thinking I am greedy, but don’t they realize that I to must pay taxes, have a mortgage car payments and kids in collage as well?

Don’t they understand that I am not paid for what I do, but for what I am willing to do for them? After all how can you properly compensate someone to risk their own life and face danger everyday they go to work?

And when I go to work I am punched, kicked, spit on and called every name in the book for doing my job. And every night I leave my house to go to work I realize I may not come back home in the morning. Because when I go to work I can be stabbed, shot, drown, fall, be electrocuted, or die in a car accident rushing to help you.

My job also requires me to carry special “tools” to help me do my job. Sometimes even while doing my job I have to defend myself from someone attacking me. Although, the newspapers will report to you that I “beat someone down”, and not that I defended myself from an attack.

While at work I must also carry a gun to protect you, but should I have to use it, the media reports to you that I “gunned someone down” or that I “shot and killed” somebody, not that I defended myself. Don’t they realize that I shoot to live and never to kill?

Also when I go to work I wrap a protective vest around me to help keep me safe through my shift. I use this vest so that I will be allowed to live to the end of my work day. And hope and pray that should something bad happen that this vest helps keep me alive so that I will be allowed to see my children grow.

When I go to my job, I will see more pain, sorrow, agony, death and destruction in one month than most of you will see in an entire lifetime.


And to the ones who don’t know me, I unforunetly will meet most of you at the worst times in your life. You often will call me to come help you out with a problem. But if you have a really big problem you can get me at a special 3 digit number and me and my coworkers will race to your house, just to help you no questions asked. All you have to do is call and we will be there for you, no matter what time, day, night or holiday, rain shine or blizzard.

Sometimes my job also requires me to deliver lectures, babies and even bad news. I am also the one required to ring your doorbell in the middle of the night, swallow hard and advise you that a loved one will not be coming home tonight, then I spend the rest of my shift wondering why I ever took such a job.

Some people even refer to me as a “pig,” but when I hear that word called to me or one of my coworkers I think of Pride, Integrity and Guts, which everyone in my profession needs to do this job.

Me and my coworkers must be able to have muscles of steel, have a sense of humor and put ourselves into dangerous situations and face danger head on all in a days work.

We must act in a second and make a decision in the blink of an eye, and spend the rest of our life hoping we made the right choice in that split second. If not we can be arrested and charged with breaking a law, be sued for violating someone’s rights, or end up with even a worse fate.

My job requires me to take an oath to be their and to risk my life to protect you. And it is an oath that me and my fellow coworkers have taken and is one that we will never break.

What, you ask is my job? I am your local police officer. And what do I ask in return of doing all this and risking my life for you? Nothing at all, because it is my job and my hope of being the one who makes the difference.


- Paul Cotter, Lynn Mass

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This article was written by me for a local newspaper to remember our fallen brother and sisters during national police week.

it was later re-published in 4 more newspapers and one national police magazine.

Officer Carroll, sir you are in my thoughts and prayers. God bless you!

Ofc. Paul Cotter
Lynn (MA) PD

February 6, 2006

Thank you for keeping our city safe and for paying for it with your life.

Currently Serving Officer
Lynn MA PD

January 27, 2006

No officer should be without a reflection. Your sacrafice has not been forgotten.

Citizen
Massachusetts

August 21, 2005

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