Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Officer Tenny Gatewood, Jr.

White Mountain Apache Tribal Police Department, Tribal Police

End of Watch Thursday, December 9, 1999

Leave a Reflection

Reflections for Officer Tenny Gatewood, Jr.

Rest in peace Officer Gatewood.

Rabbi Lewis S. Davis

January 9, 2019

We saw the Memorial for Officer Tenney Gatewood Jr. on our way to Hawley Lake. After looking up his info. and reading about him, we felt very sad for him and his family! Another sad thing was to see bullet holes in his memorial. We wish the best for his family. Officer Gatewood is in a better place. He is flying with the Angels no more earthly trials. RIP!

The Taylor Family
Concerned Citizen

July 28, 2016

RIP HERO! You were remembered today for your bravery, Sir!

Frmr Sheriff's Deputy
Marion County Sheriff, Indiana

May 5, 2014

Tenny, well it has been over 15 years, finally being able face the tragic day 12/9/99. Prior to leaving Las Vegas training, we had advised co-workers to assist you in Hon-dah Substation. But thru poor communication, no one had time to consider this. I had to live with this time after time. I know you were going thru alot during the time. We talk about this kind of situation when we work night shifts in Hondah. What if I told you, and your response was you will shoot to stop the situation. Yes, these the same things we face going out putting our life on line for friends, family, and community. It has been a painful experience my friend but you laid you life on ine for us that day. As of today Tenney nobody is station in Hondah to look out for the people like we did every night checking on our family and community member. It has been a hard 15 yrs, my career ended as of March 2012. In way it was good. I remember starting my career in April 1999 Graduating from Navajo Law Enforcement Training Academy in Toyei AZ. After eight months, I had to hear a fellow officer was killed in the line of duty. While among our agenices in different parts of the United States, never thought this would happen to this department. But it was fun to work with you, I remember we had this old suburban as a unit the four wheel would not work. And we almost got stuck out in Hawley Lake when it was snowing. Plus the remembering the same unit, the passenger side seat had no bolt to secure the seat. Every time I would accelerate it would cause the seat shift back and forth when I would brake. I would mess with you when I drove the unit. Also I recall, the time we were in the same unit we were double up. And we had a pursuit with another truck thru the back roads. The unit's battery was not secured properly and the unit shut-down on us. That was so funny sitting out there in the dark. Hilarious. Tenny was an comedian always tell jokes while on duty. Tenny your kids have grown alot now getting their own family and kids. Now I work with your brother at Game & Fish. Alot has not change still people selling illegal drugs and alcohol but even worst. The dept can't arrest people for public intoxication. We are definitely at the end times, things we used to fight against are legal like the so called medical marijuana. Well Brother You were a True Warrior, but now you fight against the evil in the spiritual realm. With our Heavenly Father. I feel at peace now being able to write my reflections of the past now I look towards the future for the healing. I used to tell you everything I would go thru as a brother would. I have learned alot thru this tragedy, and I had my own trials and tribulations. I thank only God for taking me out and thru this experience and showing me there is life after death. He laid down his life for us also to give us the power of resurrection.

Police Officer Glenn Cromwell Jr
White Mtn Apache Ranger/Police

February 5, 2014

Tenny, you made a very positive impression on me when I met you in training in Tucson in 1999. Your death struck me hard and I think of you often. I remember how you spoke to me about your family and your love for them. God bless them...I know they are proud of you and how you lived your life.

Lt. John Shearer
Chandler Police Department

February 6, 2013

"Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God."
Matthew 5:9

Marshal Chris Di Gerolamo
Federal Air Marshal Service

December 9, 2012

Tenny,
I miss the tour of dutys we shared. Your a great person and kept those shifts fun. You are deeply missed!!! RIP Brother.

Quincy Goseyun, Police Officer
Tonto Apache Police

February 16, 2012

Your heroism and service is honored today, the 10th anniversary of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Rest In Peace

Phyllis Loya
mother of falen officer Larry Lasater

December 9, 2009

Officer Gatewood,

I come to site everday and you are the featured officer on the page today 1/5/09 and I wanted you to know that you and your family are in my prayers today.

Maxine Clifford, mother of
Deputy Joshua "Raven Chief" Rutherford EOW 5/29/03

Anonymous

January 5, 2009

"The Badge"

He starts his shift each day
To respond to calls unknown.
He drives a marked patrol car.
A police officer he is known.

He's paid by the citizens' taxes
To make it safe on the streets.
But he usually has a second job
'Cause a waitress has his salary beat.

Now he doesn't know a holiday
'Cause he works all year round.
And when Thanksgiving and Christmas finally arrive
At his home he cannot be found.

He's cursed and assaulted often,
The one whos blood runs blue.
He seldom ever gets a thanks,
To some he's just a fool.

His friends are always other cops
'Cause people just don't understand
That underneath his badge and gun,
He's just another man.

He knows there might not be a tomorrow
In this world of drugs and crime.
And he gets so mad at the court system
'Cause the crooks don't get any time.

And each day when he leaves for work,
He prays to God above.
Please bring me home after my shift
So I can see the ones I love.

But tonight he stops a speeding car,
He's alone down this ole' highway.
It's just a little traffic infraction.
He does it everyday.

Well, he walks up to the driver's window,
And his badge is shining bright.
He asked the guy for a driver's license,
When a shot rang through the night.

Yes, the bullet hit its mark,
Striking the officer in the chest.
But the Department's budget didn't buy
Each officer a bullet-proof vest.

So he lay on the ground bleeding.
His blood wasn't blue - His blood was red.
And briefly he thought of his loved ones
'Cause in a moment the officer was dead.

In the news they told the story
Of how this officer had died.
And some who listened cared less,
But those who loved him cried.

Well, they buried him in uniform
With his badge pinned on his chest.
He even had his revolver,
He died doing his best.

Written By:
David L. Bell
Sergeant
Richland County Sheriff's Department
Columbia, South Carolina
Used with Special Permission of the Author
Copyright © 1993 - All Rights Reserved
and may not be duplicated without permission

Investigator David L Bell
Richland County Sheriff's Dept., Columbia, SC

March 6, 2008

You are remembered today and thank you Sir for your service

vandenberghe
mancheseter, nh

December 5, 2007

One of my co-workers told me how funny you are, when you reported for duty. She told me you always did something to cheer her up before she went out on patrol. Its was a sad day when you passed, I read the many stories about you that were posted in the local news papers, and I am also proud of the many officer from the Navajo Police that responded to help look for your killers and patrolled the local officers shifts while they could attend your funeral. You were a good officer as described from my fellow co-worker, and may you rest in peace and watch over your fellow officers from the sky above them.

MTD1 Shane Y.
Native Health Medical Transportation

May 3, 2007

You have not been forgotten as you are a true hero and heroes never die. Keep watch over your children and grandchildren, protect them from harm. Also, keep watch over those still on patro.

Bob Gordon
Father of Fallen Officer: Michael P. Gordon, EOW: 8/8/04

December 9, 2006

I had the privledge to work with Officer Tenny Gatewood and have learned alot that helped me in my career as a Tribal Police Officer, my wishes go out to his family and to all the brothers that served with Tenny and that go on doing the job that Tenny loved so much. To me Tenny was a Warrior and a protector of his people. I was blessed to have known and worked with such a great Officer. My blessings go out to his family and to the brothers that carry on his teachings.

Sgt Dan Hudspeth
Oglala Sioux Tribe Dept Public Safety

November 12, 2006

Our paths crossed through the years and called each other friends. The smile and warmth you never failed to share with others. The tragic loss on that fateful day dimmed the warmth of one that stood for his family and fellowman. You are not forgotten...as I travel through that wonderful and beautiful country you called home. May they never forget the sacrifice you made that they may be secure in their homes and homeland. God bless and keep those you left behind, which I know has been difficult but I pray they have found peace and comfort of the prayers that have been spoken on their behalf. Rest in peace, we continue the watch.

Captain
Navajo Police

May 2, 2006

Tenny, You were a great officer, But a greater friend. Your courage and devotion to duty is still admired by all of us who's lives you touch. If I have become half the officer that you had known I would be then I only have you to thank for. You are deeply missed by my family and your's, Thank You Officer T. Gatewood Jr for being my friend.

PATROL OFFICER TIM SMITH
TONTO APACHE POLICE DEPARTMENT

October 16, 2005

On the anniversary of your death, I salute you for your service and honor you for your sacrifice.

A hero never dies....

Rest in peace, hero.

December 9, 2004

God Bless You Officer Gatewood, you are a hero, and God holds you in his hands now. Your courage and bravery are not forgotten. May your family take comfort in knowing you await them in Heaven.

Sgt. Bill Richardson
Anchorage, Alaska PD

September 7, 2004

You are not forgotten................................

Sgt. Al Whitney
Yuma County Sheriff's Office, Yuma, AZ

April 20, 2004

Officer Tenny Gatewood Junior. Hello! My name is Jerilyn Lee and Tenny is my uncle. We knew him affectionally as Boy. Although all this time as gone by, we still miss him tremedously. Not a day goes by that we don't think of him. We miss him so much. Boy, we all miss you and love you and we all want you to know that you are still here in our hearts and through your kids and grandchildren. We miss you BOY!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Love Jerilyn

March 23, 2004

I ASK THAT YOU WATCH OVER ME MY FELLOW NATIVE BROTHER I KNOW YOU ARE IN A RESERVATION THAT BELONGS TO GOD.I RECENTLY JOINED MY TRIBAL POLICE DEPARTMENT AND WILL DO MY BEST. I DID NOT KNOW YOU BUT WISHED I COULD HAVE. BUT IN A WAY I KNOW YOU HAD THE SAME FEELINGS I HAVE NOW , SO BROTHER PLEASE LEAD ME.  4

Anonymous

Tho I have never met you, I hurt inside each time I read that a Tribal officer or any officer is killed in the line of duty. We work in a profession  which is looked down upon by other tribal members, but we do the job each and every day. Other agencies treat us as if we are not the " real police" but take our help for backup when they are in need. We do our jobs with pride and always knowing that we do make a difference. I salute you Officer Gatewood and know that you are now working with God in his kingdom.



WHAT IS A COP?



Cops are human ( believe it or not) just like the rest of us. They come in both sexes but mostly male. They also come in various sizes. This  sometimes depends on whether you are looking for one or trying to hide something. However, they are mostly big.



Cops are found everywhere-on land, on the sea, in the air, on horses, in cars, sometimes in your hair. In spite of the fact that " you can't find one when you want one", they are usually there when it counts most. The best way to get one is to pick up the phone.



Cops deliver lectures, babies, and bad news. They are required to have the wisdom of solomon, the disposition of a lamb and muscles of steel and are often accused of having a heart to match. He's the one who rings the door-bell, swallows hard and announces the passing of a loved one; then spends the rest of the day wondering why he ever took such a "crummy" job.



On TV, a cop is an oaf who couldn't find a bull fiddle in a telephone booth. In real life he's expected to find a little blond boy " about so high" in a crowd of a half million people. In fiction, he gets help from private eyes, reporters, and who-dun-it fans."  In real life, mostly all he gets from the public is " I didn't see nuttin'."



When he serves a summons, he's a monster. If he lets you go, he's a doll. To little kids, he's either a friend or a bogeyman, depending on how the parents feel about it. He works " around the clock", split shifts, Sundays and holidays, and it always kills him when a joker says. " Hey tomorrow is Election Day, I'm off, let's go fishing" ( that's the day he works 20 hours).



A cop is like the little girl, who, when she was good, was very, very good, but, when she was bad, was horrid. When a cop is good, " he's getting paid for it." When he makes a mistake, " he's a grafter, and that goes for the rest of them too." When he shoots a stick-up man he's a hero, except when the stick-up man is " only a kid, anybody coulda seen that."



Lots of them have homes, some of them covered with ivy, but most of them covered with mortgages. If he drives a big car, he's a chiseler; a little car, "who's he kidding?" His credit is good; this is very helpful, because his salary isn't. Cops raise lots of kids; most of them belong to other people.



A cop sees more misery, bloodshed, trouble, and sunrises than the average person. Like the postman, cops must also be out in all kinds of weather. His uniform changes with the climate, but his outlook on life remains about the same: mostly a blank, but hoping for a better world.



Cops like days off, vacations, and coffee. They don't like auto horns, family fights, and anonymous letter writers. They have unions, but they can't strike. They must be impartial, courteous, and always remember the slogan " At your service." This is sometimes hard, especially when a character reminds him, " I'm a taxpayer, I pay your salary."



Cops get medals for saving lives, stopping runaway horses, and shooting it out with the bandits ( once in a while his widow gets the medal). But sometimes, the most rewarding moment comes when, after some small kindness to an older person, he feels the warm hand clasp, looks into  grateful eyes  and hears, " Thank you and God bless you, son."



Conrad S. Jensen

Det/Sgt. J.E. Loonsfoot
Grand Traverse Band Tribal Police, Mi.

this un timely death of officer Gatewood will always make a person as myself feel like another brother is gone iam currently working as a intern as a police officer with the rosebud police department in the heart of the lakota nation and i will not let this make my decision to not become a officer either tribal or with another agency.

Lyle Bear Looks Back

While I was travellling this weekend and enjoying the views of the beautiful white mountains, I came upon the memorial to officer Gatewood. I was touched. Having several friends on the police force here in Tucson, I was inspired to find more information. How terribly tragic! My best goes out to the Gatewood family. I hope this memorial site is inspiring to others as it was to me. I will tell many of my experience.
Holly Schroeder

Holly Schroeder

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