Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Patrolman Gregory J. Neupert

New Orleans Police Department, Louisiana

End of Watch Saturday, November 8, 1980

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Reflections for Patrolman Gregory J. Neupert

Dear Greg
My young partner here it is over 30yrs later still like that night you lost your life as you did only you and I and the shooter knows anything other than how they played your killing Big brother Lt Don Brewer is gone on now probably alot of people since to bad you didnt get to work with him you would have been a great cop with little tutoring .Just remembering you my friend your life ending over some of pitiful people RIP Partner till we meet again

Michael Brewer patrolman and partner
New Orleans Police 1981

February 28, 2020

Rest in peace Patrolman Neupert. Young and brave honoring the Big Easy city and its folks.

Rabbi Lewis S. Davis

July 1, 2018

Old school justice saved the taxpayers from housing those mutts in prison!!! God bless him and his fellow officers and especially his family.

Judge /retired SC Trooper Danny Lynn
Aiken County, SC

November 8, 2016

As Houston prepares to bury another officer, indeed every time I hear of another officer killed in the line of duty, I think of Greg. I think of that horribly phone call that came in the middle of the night, of my grandmother crying, inconsolable, at his wake and funeral, of the unshakable faith of my aunt and uncle, of a much-too-young widow. Then I remember growing up with Greg, the young man who lit up a room the minute he walked in and how much he loved being a police officer. It's disgusting that when his name is googled, the stories of his murderers seem to take priority. God bless and protect all our men in blue. #bluehouston

Cynthia Schmidt Juntti
Greg's cousin

September 3, 2015

Dear Gregory, your death was not in vain. In fact, I am convinced that as a result of your sacrifice, you are responsible for saving the lives of countless NOPD Officers that followed in your footsteps.

This is how I remember that fateful night:
I was just finishing the police academy when I was assigned to ride with members of the plain clothes Felony Action Squad (FAS). We were working the 1st District (French Quarter & Central Business District) which shared the radio channel with your 4th District (Algiers) across the MS River.

There was a huge fire at Basin & S. Claiborne that engulfed the telephone & electrical lines. As a result, hundreds of burglar alarms were triggered simultaneously.

Our beloved politicians, in an effort to save money, replaced seasoned veteran police officers that knew the streets and the job from the dispatch center with civilians that had no clue as to how to perform your job, what support from them that you needed, nor could they handle the stress of working a radio channel with multiple emergencies at one time.

When you tried to tell the dispatcher that you were exiting your vehicle, the dispatcher told you to stand-by because of the fire & multitude of alarms in the 1st. They never got your location, the reason you were exiting your vehicle, or a description of the subjects that took your life.

I fault your rank also as it is their duty to protect their officers. It wasn't until hours later that they tried to call you but by then it was too late. A roll call went out over the air & unit by unit responded except for you. We raced across the river to join in the search for you and were of the 1st to find you, again too late to help save you.

You were the 1st in everything in my career. The 1st crime scene that I went on. The 1st homicide victim that I saw. The 1st brother officer that I saw slain in the line of duty. I have never forgotten you or what your sacrifice taught me and as a result, how you ended up protecting the lives of countless officers that came after you including myself.

You taught me to never allow a dispatcher to tell me to stand-by when I was exiting my unit for any reason. When I became a Sergeant, I instructed my officers to always make sure they broadcast over the air whenever they exited their units. God help the dispatcher that ever tried to tell any of my officers to stand-by because they were to busy to get their information. I chastised many a dispatcher over the air and when needed, they got a personal visit from me. I guarantee they never did it again.

So, while your sacrifice was tragic in so many ways & probably could have been prevented if you had received the support you should have received, it was not in vain.

Thanks Gregory. May God bless you and your family. Rest in peace, brother.

Sgt. Glen Forman, Retired
New Orleans Police Department

September 1, 2015

Dear Gregory, your death was not in vain. In fact, I am convinced that as a result of your sacrifice, you are responsible for saving the lives of countless NOPD Officers that followed in your footsteps.

This is how I remember that fateful night:
I was just finishing the police academy when I was assigned to ride with members of the plain clothes Felony Action Squad (FAS). We were working the 1st District (French Quarter & Central Business District) which shared the radio channel with your 4th District (Algiers) across the MS River.

There was a huge fire at Basin & S. Claiborne that engulfed the telephone & electrical lines. As a result, hundreds of burglar alarms were triggered simultaneously.

Our beloved politicians, in an effort to save money, replaced seasoned veteran police officers that knew the streets and the job from the dispatch center with civilians that had no clue as to how to perform your job, what support from them that you needed, nor could they handle the stress of working a radio channel with multiple emergencies at one time.

When you tried to tell the dispatcher that you were exiting your vehicle, the dispatcher told you to stand-by because of the fire & multitude of alarms in the 1st. They never got your location, the reason you were exiting your vehicle, or a description of the subjects that took your life.

I fault your rank also as it is their duty to protect their officers. It wasn't until hours later that they tried to call you but by then it was too late. A roll call went out over the air & unit by unit responded except for you. We raced across the river to join in the search for you and were of the 1st to find you, again too late to help save you.

You were the 1st in everything in my career. The 1st crime scene that I went on. The 1st homicide victim that I saw. The 1st brother officer that I saw slain in the line of duty. I have never forgotten you or what your sacrifice taught me and as a result, how you ended up protecting the lives of countless officers that came after you including myself.

You taught me to never allow a dispatcher to tell me to stand-by when I was exiting my unit for any reason. When I became a Sergeant, I instructed my officers to always make sure they broadcast over the air whenever they exited their units. God help the dispatcher that ever tried to tell any of my officers to stand-by because they were to busy to get their information. I chastised many a dispatcher over the air and when needed, they got a personal visit from me. I guarantee they never did it again.

So, while your sacrifice was tragic in so many ways & probably could have been prevented if you had received the support you should have received, it was not in vain.

Thanks Gregory. May God bless you and your family. Rest in peace, brother.

Sgt. Glen Forman, Retired
New Orleans Police Department

August 28, 2015

God Bless the Fallen......... In the Greater Glory of God

But if I could get ahold of Wortmann and Hornsby please take note.

I did not know Neupert, I was OPCSO, but may God send a major blessing, where your soul is soon to go. AMEN

CSD (Hon) NODCS Keith Holstead
NO Civil Sheriff

September 18, 2013

God Bless the Fallen......... In the Greater Glory of God

But if I could get ahold of Wortmann and Hornsby please take note.

I did know Neupert, I was OCSO, but may God send a major blessing, where your soul is soon to go. AMEN

CSD (Hon) NODCS Keith Holstead
NO Civil Sheriff

September 18, 2013

Thanks for your heartfelt comments regarding the death of a man who should be bouncing grandchildren on a knee or taking a small boat out on the lake at sunrise. I'm so sorry for you as I know some of what you feel based on my first hand experiences of fellow agents killed in my career working the streets of New Orleans. Like his group back in 1972, the Feds also tried to stem violent crime by the creation of various task forces, one of which i was part of.

Like you said in your correspondence, i am often struck at the compete worthlessness of the trash we spend our lives trying to arrest and convict. It's so sad that Greg is gone and more of them keep coming from out of the landfills of existence.

Special Agent
DOJ

August 9, 2013

Everytime I hear that an Officer is Murdered, my heart dies a little more. I ache for the familie knowing well what they will have to face each day for the remainder of their lives. Mothers without sons, fathers with no one to pass on their legacy and advise, siblings lost not knowing what to do to make their parents lives whole again and not to speak of spouses who are in a whirlwind of cloudy confusion. We had not a child, I cannot say if this was a good situation or a terrible loss,but I wonder after 32 years if it would have helped on those nights that never ended, or my memory of the color of your eyes and hair. Your life had been forever ended, and your families has been forever wounded. How did your brothers tell their sons you existed and what a devoted man you were?
These are questions I think of each time a Brother officer is mortally wounded. I just wonder if the average family ever thinks of this each time their father or mother leaver the house to provide for their family?

After 32 year or maybe the next 60 years I wonder if these emotions will ever cease? Will I ever be able to open my eyes in the morning without wondering if I had just a nightmare? This is the future life for each and every family of each officer lost to our communities. Each day the heart withers a little more and the memory of his face blur. But the hurt intensifies and the guilt that I remained to carry on "Life", is a burden we must carry. We are told that we must be strong and move along in our lives, but how many average citizens do such? Back to the question I started with "Will these emotions ever cease each time an Officer is lost".
I hope not, it makes me remember that these men and women did not die invein!

Robin Neupert Pillow
Widow of NOPD Slain Officer

August 22, 2012

Greg and I graduated from the police academy in 1979. As we all were then, Greg was full of life, he had such a passion for learning the job. In fact, he was the guy who always asked questions from the instructors. After the academy, I was assigned to the 5th District, Greg went across the river to the 4th. We still hung out socially and remained good friends. I shall never forget your passion for life and your commentment to the safety of New Orleans. You Greg are still the MAN !!!

P/O David Wortmann
NOPD retired

March 6, 2012

Robin: When I heard yours and Greg's names on the Channel 6 story this morning, I had an immediate recollection that you were in my mathematics class at UNO not long after Greg's death. I recall how nice you were, and it was wonderful to see you on the story after all these years. I hope that all of this works out for you eventually. My prayers and best wishes go out to you and your family.

John Hornsby
Mandeville, LA

John Hornsby
Robin's former UNO Math Instructor

March 6, 2012

I came across your story and that of Robins via the internet. I did not know you, nor were we kin, what I do know is that you will always be a fellow brother officer. Whatever the reason, for the situation at hand, I hope that it gets cleared up and settled, so that you may truly rest.

Ramon Cervantes - Senior Police Officer
Houston Police Department

March 6, 2012

NOPD may have trashed your portrait in the 4th District Station house, and many do not remember your name, but be assured that your ultimate sacrifice will always be in the hearts of true friends and your family. Thirty-one years, I have lived a lifetime since your murder. No one told me life just isn't fair. You are forever in my thoughts.

Robin Neupert Pillow
Wife

December 20, 2011

If the Rank had the balls to but us together that night as I requested, you would still be with us. Rest in peace my friend and brother.

Retired P/O Clyde Angelo
New Orleans Police Department

November 1, 2011

Your heroism and service is honored today, the 30th anniversary of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

I pray for solace for those who love and miss you.
Rest In Peace

Phyllis Loya

Phyllis Loya
mom of fallen officer Larry Lasater

November 8, 2010

This job was your joy in life and you gave your all for the citizens of New Orleans!

Robin Neupert
wife

September 25, 2009

You are remembered today and thank you Sir for your service

VanDenBerghe
NH

November 3, 2007

The Badge"
He starts his shift each day
To respond to calls unknown.
He drives a marked patrol car.
A police officer he is known.
He's paid by the citizens' taxes
To make it safe on the streets.
But he usually has a second job
'Cause a waitress has his salary beat.
Now he doesn't know a holiday
'Cause he works all year round.
And when Thanksgiving and Christmas finally arrive
At his home he cannot be found.
He's cursed and assaulted often,
The one whos blood runs blue.
He seldom ever gets a thanks,
To some he's just a fool.
His friends are always other cops
'Cause people just don't understand
That underneath his badge and gun,
He's just another man.
He knows there might not be a tomorrow
In this world of drugs and crime.
And he gets so mad at the court system
'Cause the crooks don't get any time.
And each day when he leaves for work,
He prays to God above.
Please bring me home after my shift
So I can see the ones I love.
But tonight he stops a speeding car,
He's alone down this ole' highway.
It's just a little traffic infraction.
He does it everyday.
Well, he walks up to the driver's window,
And his badge is shining bright.
He asked the guy for a driver's license,
When a shot rang through the night.
Yes, the bullet hit its mark,
Striking the officer in the chest.
But the Department's budget didn't buy
Each officer a bullet-proof vest.
So he lay on the ground bleeding.
His blood wasn't blue - His blood was red.
And briefly he thought of his loved ones
'Cause in a moment the officer was dead.
In the news they told the story
Of how this officer had died.
And some who listened cared less,
But those who loved him cried.
Well, they buried him in uniform
With his badge pinned on his chest.
He even had his revolver,
He died doing his best.
Written By:
David L. Bell
Sergeant
Richland County Sheriff's Department
Columbia, South Carolina
Used with Special Permission of the Author
Copyright © 1999 - All Rights Reserved
and may not be duplicated without permission

Investigator David L Bell
Richland County Sheriff's Dept., Columbia, SC

November 1, 2007

The policeman stood and faced God,
Which must always come to pass.
He hoped his shoes were shining,
Just as brightly as his brass.

"Step forward now, policeman.
How shall I deal with you?
Have you always turned the other cheek?
To my church have you been true?"

The policeman squared his shoulders and said,
"No lord, I guess I ain't,
Because those of us who carry a badge
can't always be a saint."

I've had to work most Sundays,
and at times my talk was rough,
and sometimes I've been violent,
Because the streets are awfully tough.

But I never took a penny,
That wasn't mine to keep
Though I worked a lot of overtime
When the bills got just too steep.

And I never passed a cry for help,
Though at time I shook with fear.
And sometimes, God forgive me,
I've wept unmanly tears.

I know I don't deserve a place
Among the people here.
They never wanted me around
Except to calm their fear.

If you've a place for me here, Lord,
It needn't be so grand.
I never expected or had too much,
But if you don't I'll understand.

There was a silence all around the throne
Where the saints had often trod.
As the policeman waited quietly,
For the judgment of his god.

"Step forward now, policeman,
You've born your burdens well.
Come walk a beat on Heaven's streets,
You've done your time in hell"

Anonymous

March 29, 2007

Patrolman Neupert, your sacrifice will not be forgotten. Know you made New Orleans a safer place while you served. May you rest in peace.

Family of Patrolman Cliff Miller
Rossford, Ohio P.D., EOW 05/14/1966

September 19, 2006

I think of you often. My father Dave Dean worked with you. I remember when you were shot. I was 9 years old, but it has always had a lasting impression on me. I just attended a memorial for Deputy Blake Gammil killed in the line of duty last year. It made me think of you. My father and his friends will never forget. Thinking of you...Tracie Dean

Tracie Dean

February 28, 2006

Greg was a great police officer and a very good friend. I miss him very much and will never forget his sense of duty and his sense of humor.

Police Officer IV Juan Curet (RET)
New Orleans Police Dept.

December 16, 2003

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