Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Patrolman Roy Odes Caffey

South Carolina Highway Patrol, South Carolina

End of Watch Sunday, October 8, 1972

Leave a Reflection

Reflections for Patrolman Roy Odes Caffey

Rest in peace.

Lt. Jim Russo

October 8, 2017

We honor you Sir; thank you for your service.

Sgt Yoli Trujillo, Retired
Corpus Christi (Tx) P.D.

October 8, 2017

Always.

Robert Caffey
Son

July 2, 2016

Today on the anniversary of your death we wish to remember you and thank you Sir for your service.

D. Holmes, Lieutenant
Federal Bureau of Prisons

October 8, 2014

Today I attended SCHP Memorial Service dedicated to you and your 49 fellow troopers who gave the ultimate sacrifice. Thank you for being my dad and my hero.

Son
Son

May 2, 2014

To fully appreciate the heroes of the present, we must recognize our heroes of the past. Your heroism and service is honored today, the 41st anniversary year of your death. I am privileged to leave a tribute to you. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service.

My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer who was murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Time never diminishes respect. Your memory will always be honored and revered. Rest In Peace.

Phyllis Lasater Loya
mom of fallen officer Larry Lasater

November 5, 2013

Each time I visit these pages, I recall the many times I heard Roy Caffey's voice on the radio during the late 50's and early 60's when I was a SC Highway Patrolman in Aiken County, SC. Caffey obviously worked hard and interacted with dispatch frequently, often questioniong the information he received. Each time I pass through Temple, Texas, his home town, I think of this good man. All of us gave some; some of us gave all. It is hoped that his son has found peace and realizes his father would want him to understand that life continues even under the most adverse of circumstances. Roy Caffey was a highly dedicated officer of the law. David Barrineau, Dallas, Texas

David Barrineau, Special Agent, Retired
ATF, Former SC Highway Patrolman

August 23, 2008

We thank you for your service to the South Carolina Highway Patrol and to the citizens of South Carolina. You and your bravery will not be forgotten.

Rest in peace.

Lois Rao
Surviving Mother

June 10, 2008

I love you Daddy.

Robert
Son

April 5, 2008

My prayers are with you and your family.

Former N.H. Police Officer
Fauquier County, VA

October 10, 2007

Today on the anniversary of your death, it is with great honor that we remember you and thank you Sir for your service.


God Bless your wife, son, police family and friends.

Pat Van Den Berghe
Neighbors for a Better manchester, NH

October 8, 2007

For the times you were always there, thank you.

Anonymous

August 30, 2007

"The Badge"
He starts his shift each day
To respond to calls unknown.
He drives a marked patrol car.
A police officer he is known.
He's paid by the citizens' taxes
To make it safe on the streets.
But he usually has a second job
'Cause a waitress has his salary beat.
Now he doesn't know a holiday
'Cause he works all year round.
And when Thanksgiving and Christmas finally arrive
At his home he cannot be found.
He's cursed and assaulted often,
The one whos blood runs blue.
He seldom ever gets a thanks,
To some he's just a fool.
His friends are always other cops
'Cause people just don't understand
That underneath his badge and gun,
He's just another man.
He knows there might not be a tomorrow
In this world of drugs and crime.
And he gets so mad at the court system
'Cause the crooks don't get any time.
And each day when he leaves for work,
He prays to God above.
Please bring me home after my shift
So I can see the ones I love.
But tonight he stops a speeding car,
He's alone down this ole' highway.
It's just a little traffic infraction.
He does it everyday.
Well, he walks up to the driver's window,
And his badge is shining bright.
He asked the guy for a driver's license,
When a shot rang through the night.
Yes, the bullet hit its mark,
Striking the officer in the chest.
But the Department's budget didn't buy
Each officer a bullet-proof vest.
So he lay on the ground bleeding.
His blood wasn't blue - His blood was red.
And briefly he thought of his loved ones
'Cause in a moment the officer was dead.
In the news they told the story
Of how this officer had died.
And some who listened cared less,
But those who loved him cried.
Well, they buried him in uniform
With his badge pinned on his chest.
He even had his revolver,
He died doing his best.
Written By:
David L. Bell
Sergeant
Richland County Sheriff's Department
Columbia, South Carolina
Used with Special Permission of the Author
Copyright © 1999 - All Rights Reserved
and may not be duplicated without permission

Investigator David L Bell
Richland County Sheriff's Dept.

July 11, 2007

I miss him very much. His death has had the greatest impact on my life and has left me with dispair and great confusion. I was 15 at the time of his death and my mother died when I was 18 with a broken heart. Being an only child with no guidance, I had to leave being a teenager and grow into an adult too soon. It has left a devasting impact on my profesional and personal life. After, 25 years of working his death, I finally found SOME resolution to those who may have murdered him. But that is uncertain. Robert A. Caffey, Son.

Son, Robert A. Caffey
Son

May 1, 2007

As an Orangeburg native, I think of Officer Caffey everytime I pass that spot on I-26. A true tragedy, and he was a good man. I was 8 years old at the time this happened, but rememeber it vividly. He was a good man....

Mark

April 8, 2007

The policeman stood and faced God,
Which must always come to pass.
He hoped his shoes were shining,
Just as brightly as his brass.

"Step forward now, policeman.
How shall I deal with you?
Have you always turned the other cheek?
To my church have you been true?"

The policeman squared his shoulders and said,
"No lord, I guess I ain't,
Because those of us who carry a badge
can't always be a saint."

I've had to work most Sundays,
and at times my talk was rough,
and sometimes I've been violent,
Because the streets are awfully tough.

But I never took a penny,
That wasn't mine to keep
Though I worked a lot of overtime
When the bills got just too steep.

And I never passed a cry for help,
Though at time I shook with fear.
And sometimes, God forgive me,
I've wept unmanly tears.

I know I don't deserve a place
Among the people here.
They never wanted me around
Except to calm their fear.

If you've a place for me here, Lord,
It needn't be so grand.
I never expected or had too much,
But if you don't I'll understand.

There was a silence all around the throne
Where the saints had often trod.
As the policeman waited quietly,
For the judgement of his god.

"Step forward now, policeman,
You've born your burdens well.
Come walk a beat on Heaven's streets,
You've done your time in hell"

GREGG HOUSTON
SOUTH CAROLINA

March 5, 2005

05/22/04

Each day I try to read the ODMP. Today I read your story. Any officer who dies in the line of duty will always be remembered for his sacrifice. You died a hero. Rest in peace Trooper Caffey.

Captain Robert W Cannon, Ret.
Vermilion Co, Il. Sheriff's Dept.

May 22, 2004

12-01-03, MY BROTHER, MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND CONTINUE TO BLESS YOUR FAMILY AND LOVED ONES. YOU HAVE BEEN GONE FOR MANY YEARS, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN. A HERO IS NEVER FORGOTTEN. DEAD OR ALIVE, YOUR KILLERS SOMEDAY WILL HAVE TO PAY FOR YOUR MURDER. REST IN PEACE MY BROTHER.

CHIEF RONNIE WATFORD-RET.
JEFFERSON POLICE DEPT,S.C.

December 1, 2003

My wife and children were the ones finding this officer on the roadside. My son got into the patrol car, used the radio and asked for help. Immediately, the dispatcher asked what was going on and when told replied not to touch anything except the switch for the lights and stay by the radio. Within moments other officers arrived on the scene with ambulances and carried the Patrolman away in the ambulance. It is so sad that someone could shoot a patrollman. However I am proud that my family was of some assistance to our law enforcement officers. I feel sure he was a fine officer, husband and father.

Paul Fitzgerald, Witness
Dept. of the Navy

Rest easy, Troop. You are not forgotten. Never.

Deputy M. Moore
Warren County S.O. (OH)

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