Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Sheriff James Christopher Burns

Sanpete County Sheriff's Department, Utah

End of Watch Wednesday, September 26, 1894

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Reflections for Sheriff James Christopher Burns

My family has had sheep on Reeder for longer than the shooting. I am intrigued by the comment that the shooters were later apprehended. My sources, their families etc know otherwise they were actually shot. By a burns relative. Please contact me for more info I would like to know your sources for the claim of later being apprehended

Michael black
Rancher

January 11, 2019

Pioneer of the Month - December



WHO WAS SHERIFF JAMES BURNS?

James Christopher Burns was the son of John and Lydia Ann Porter Burns. He was born in Linden-Rock Port, Atchison Missouri in September of 1849. His parents were headed for California in the Great Gold Rush of 1849.
At the place known as “the Last Crossing of the Sweetwater”, in the State of Wyoming, two-month old baby James Burns was found by a company of other travelers. He was lying at his mother’s breast. Both parents lay cold in the embrace of death. They had succumbed to the deadly disease of cholera. Deadly cholera is a very contagious disease. One brave soul from the company by the name of Milton Dailey risked his life to save the baby, if possible. The kind-hearted people of the wagon train did what they could for the baby, and they put forth efforts to find any relatives.

Arriving in Salt Lake City, they found the Saints gathering for conference, and Milton Dailey, gave the baby to Brigham Young who held him in his arms before the conference gathering, told of his parents tragic death and asked for information. The baby’s aunt, his mother’s sister, was among the saints and claimed the child.

He was then taken to the home of his grandmother at Provo, Utah. His early boyhood and manhood was spent in Mt. Pleasant, where he was educated and grew to the type of man that earned the love and respect of all who came in contact with him.

He fell in love with Matilda Josephine Anderson. It was thought by many to be “love at first sight”. James Burns often remarked that when he gazed into Matilda’s eyes of blue, he knew she was the one being in the world to make him happy. They were married on the 22nd March 1869.

After the Blackhawk War, he made friends with the red men, allowing his children to play with them, learn the Indian songs and dances, and many of their phrases.

James Burns prospered and progressed and became the Sheriff of Mt. Pleasant, and later served the people of Sanpete County in the same capacity.

Then on the 24th of September 1894, he received a telegraph notice from Scott Bruno, asking him to meet him in the morning at Moroni, as there had been a sheep stealing case.

The following is taken from the writings of Niels Heber Anderson:
‘Bill Brewer, Scott Bruno, Niels Heber Anderson and Sheriff James Burns confronted sheep rustlers at Reader’s Ridge back of the Horseshoe Mountain. Evidence of the changing of the ear marks and brands made it quite clear that certain sheep had been stolen.

Sheriff Burns made an attempt to place the rustlers under arrest without first disarming them. As he approached them, they shot and killed the sheriff, then warned the other men that if they did not stay out of the affair, they would receive the same treatment as had been given the sheriff.

Bill Brewer and Anderson brought the news to Spring City and Mt. Pleasant. Thomas Braby, with the Mt. Pleasant Militia, was soon on the scene of the shooting, and the body of James C. Burns was taken to Mt. Pleasant. Although the Militia searched and guarded for a couple of weeks in the ledges and dense timber, the murderers were never apprehended.’ (This has since been proven wrong. They were apprehended)

“James Burns’ life was short but some there are who do not have to live long to accomplish big things. He was killed in the performance of his duty.” Olivia Burns – daughter in law and author of James Burns History
at 3:49 PM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
Labels: Anderson, Bruno, Burns, Cholera, Porter, Sheriff Jame Burns
3 comments:

Leslie said...

James Christopher Burns is one of my ancestors! I would like to link these photos and this story to his page on FamilySearch.org. Would that be alright?
Saturday, 03 August, 2013
Leslie said...

James Christopher Burns is my ancestor! I would like to upload these pictures and this story to his page on FamilySearch.org. Would that be alright?
Saturday, 03 August, 2013
Kathy Hafen said...

Yes, You May !
Saturday, 03 August, 2013

Post a Comment Pioneer of the Month - December



WHO WAS SHERIFF JAMES BURNS?

James Christopher Burns was the son of John and Lydia Ann Porter Burns. He was born in Linden-Rock Port, Atchison Missouri in September of 1849. His parents were headed for California in the Great Gold Rush of 1849.
At the place known as “the Last Crossing of the Sweetwater”, in the State of Wyoming, two-month old baby James Burns was found by a company of other travelers. He was lying at his mother’s breast. Both parents lay cold in the embrace of death. They had succumbed to the deadly disease of cholera. Deadly cholera is a very contagious disease. One brave soul from the company by the name of Milton Dailey risked his life to save the baby, if possible. The kind-hearted people of the wagon train did what they could for the baby, and they put forth efforts to find any relatives.

Arriving in Salt Lake City, they found the Saints gathering for conference, and Milton Dailey, gave the baby to Brigham Young who held him in his arms before the conference gathering, told of his parents tragic death and asked for information. The baby’s aunt, his mother’s sister, was among the saints and claimed the child.

He was then taken to the home of his grandmother at Provo, Utah. His early boyhood and manhood was spent in Mt. Pleasant, where he was educated and grew to the type of man that earned the love and respect of all who came in contact with him.

He fell in love with Matilda Josephine Anderson. It was thought by many to be “love at first sight”. James Burns often remarked that when he gazed into Matilda’s eyes of blue, he knew she was the one being in the world to make him happy. They were married on the 22nd March 1869.

After the Blackhawk War, he made friends with the red men, allowing his children to play with them, learn the Indian songs and dances, and many of their phrases.

James Burns prospered and progressed and became the Sheriff of Mt. Pleasant, and later served the people of Sanpete County in the same capacity.

Then on the 24th of September 1894, he received a telegraph notice from Scott Bruno, asking him to meet him in the morning at Moroni, as there had been a sheep stealing case.

The following is taken from the writings of Niels Heber Anderson:
‘Bill Brewer, Scott Bruno, Niels Heber Anderson and Sheriff James Burns confronted sheep rustlers at Reader’s Ridge back of the Horseshoe Mountain. Evidence of the changing of the ear marks and brands made it quite clear that certain sheep had been stolen.

Sheriff Burns made an attempt to place the rustlers under arrest without first disarming them. As he approached them, they shot and killed the sheriff, then warned the other men that if they did not stay out of the affair, they would receive the same treatment as had been given the sheriff.

Bill Brewer and Anderson brought the news to Spring City and Mt. Pleasant. Thomas Braby, with the Mt. Pleasant Militia, was soon on the scene of the shooting, and the body of James C. Burns was taken to Mt. Pleasant. Although the Militia searched and guarded for a couple of weeks in the ledges and dense timber, the murderers were never apprehended.’ (This has since been proven wrong. They were apprehended)

“James Burns’ life was short but some there are who do not have to live long to accomplish big things. He was killed in the performance of his duty.” Olivia Burns – daughter in law and author of James Burns History
at 3:49 PM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
Labels: Anderson, Bruno, Burns, Cholera, Porter, Sheriff Jame Burns
3 comments:

Leslie said...

James Christopher Burns is one of my ancestors! I would like to link these photos and this story to his page on FamilySearch.org. Would that be alright?
Saturday, 03 August, 2013
Leslie said...

James Christopher Burns is my ancestor! I would like to upload these pictures and this story to his page on FamilySearch.org. Would that be alright?
Saturday, 03 August, 2013
Kathy Hafen said...

Yes, You May !
Saturday, 03 August, 2013

Post a Comment

Capt Michael Royce, UHP retired
Distant relative

December 30, 2018

Your memory and service continues to give me the courage and fervor to live every day to the fullest.

Carly Burns
Great Great Granddaughter

April 10, 2016

"You feed the soul and the soul gives you Courage and courage is what it takes to disseminate the truth"

Wayne Travis Nebeker
Great Grandson

October 15, 2015

"You feed the soul and the soul gives you Courage and courage is what it takes to disseminate the truth"
Your Courage has fed My Soul Sheriff Burns.

Wayne Travis Nebeker
Great Grandson

October 15, 2015

My grandfather,your grandson Dick, told me why you took the job
as it was told to him before your son (his Dad)was also murdered.
God bless you for having the courage to come forward and serve when called upon.

Doug Jones
Great Grandson
"You'll never be forgotten"

October 7, 2013

Your heroism and service is honored today, the 115th anniversary of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

How very sad the Burns family endured this tragedy twice with 2 line of duty deaths.
Rest In Peace

Phyllis Loya

Anonymous

September 26, 2009

Sheriff Burns your work on this Earth as we know it, is done. You are in God's Hands now. May you rest in peace.

SGT. Daryl Brewer
Clarksville Police Dept. Clarksville, Tennessee

May 28, 2008

Sheriff Burns was my Great Grandfather and, having read how he died...and more important how he lived, I am very proud and I sincerely thank those that honor his sacrafice.

Scott Burns
White House

May 10, 2005

Thank You!

September 26, 2004

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