Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Patrolman Charles E. Bruce

Fort Lauderdale Police Department, Florida

End of Watch Wednesday, August 24, 1983

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Reflections for Patrolman Charles E. Bruce

I first met Charlie Bruce in the early 1960s, He was a city life guard, Life Guard station 5. To a lot of us teens he was one we admired as he kept us in line, plus allt the joking and teasing he was famous for. Never forget his smile and the little half laugh/half giggle ge had. When I became a proud FLPD Officer in 1970 (also FLPD reserve 68-69). Got to meet Charlie again. Great to work with, great to learn from, just fun to be around. Never forget the gags and practical jokes he Fred Holowell together pulled on George Bartold. Miss those times! RIP MY BROTHER

Detective Sergeant Rad Fox
Fort Lauderdale, Fla Police Department

August 24, 2018

CHARLES E. BRUCE

Just to let you know you are missed. Ed Junne my stepfather would tell stories about you and now I tell them to my grand kids to make sure your not forgotten. The only time I ran into you was once at the drive in my mother worked at and once when you pulled over my friend and I was with him and yes you gave him a ticket and he was pissed but as I told him if he wouldn't have been driving like an ass he wouldn't have gotten the ticket. So rest in peace and I hope to see you again. I bet you and Ed are telling some stories right now. God Bless You

Dernnis Padgett
Step son of Edward C Junne.

January 18, 2018

Daddy,
I miss you so much, it hurts as much today as it did back then. I could not have asked for a better father or role model. I love you and what I would give for just one more day. I never thought when you left the house that day you would not be coming back (my 21st birthday). I am so glad I gave you that hug and kiss and told you I loved you that day as you rode off on that beautiful motorcyle. I can still see you riding away and waving. God Bless you and keep you safe till we meet again. Love your Pam Pam.

T. Bruce
daughter

February 3, 2014

To fully appreciate the heroes of the present, we must recognize our heroes of the past. I am privileged to pay tribute to you. Your heroism and service is honored today, the 30th anniversary year of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer who was murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Time never diminishes respect. Your memory will always be honored and revered.

I pray for solace for all those that love and remember you for I know that both the pain and pride are forever. Your family is in my heart's embrace. Rest In Peace.

Phyllis Loya
Mom of fallen California Officer Larry Lasater, Pittsburg PD, eow 4/24/05

April 12, 2013

Rest in Peace, Patrolman Bruce. Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

Officer 11169

February 9, 2012

My prayers are with the Bruce family today as they face another EOW. May God continue to be with them and guide them. Patrolman Bruce, you sir are a hero who we will never forget, may you continue to rest in peace.

Deb Azure
Mother of Deputy Renee Danell Azure
EOW 08/06/02
Union County SO, Lake Butler, FL

deb

August 24, 2011

"The Badge"

He starts his shift each day
To respond to calls unknown.
He drives a marked patrol car.
A police officer he is known.

He's paid by the citizens' taxes
To make it safe on the streets.
But he usually has a second job
'Cause a waitress has his salary beat.

Now he doesn't know a holiday
'Cause he works all year round.
And when Thanksgiving and Christmas finally arrive
At his home he cannot be found.

He's cursed and assaulted often,
The one whos blood runs blue.
He seldom ever gets a thanks,
To some he's just a fool.

His friends are always other cops
'Cause people just don't understand
That underneath his badge and gun,
He's just another man.

He knows there might not be a tomorrow
In this world of drugs and crime.
And he gets so mad at the court system
'Cause the crooks don't get any time.

And each day when he leaves for work,
He prays to God above.
Please bring me home after my shift
So I can see the ones I love.

But tonight he stops a speeding car,
He's alone down this ole' highway.
It's just a little traffic infraction.
He does it everyday.

Well, he walks up to the driver's window,
And his badge is shining bright.
He asked the guy for a driver's license,
When a shot rang through the night.

Yes, the bullet hit its mark,
Striking the officer in the chest.
But the Department's budget didn't buy
Each officer a bullet-proof vest.

So he lay on the ground bleeding.
His blood wasn't blue - His blood was red.
And briefly he thought of his loved ones
'Cause in a moment the officer was dead.

In the news they told the story
Of how this officer had died.
And some who listened cared less,
But those who loved him cried.

Well, they buried him in uniform
With his badge pinned on his chest.
He even had his revolver,
He died doing his best.

Written By:
David L. Bell
Sergeant
Richland County Sheriff's Department
Columbia, South Carolina
Used with Special Permission of the Author
Copyright © 1999 - All Rights Reserved
and may not be duplicated without permission

Investigator David L Bell
Richland County Sheriff's Dept., Columbia, SC

December 12, 2007

Rest in peace motorman.

Offc. Michael Walker
Tallahassee Police Department

August 24, 2007

CHARLIE I CAN NOT BELIEVE YOU HAVE BEEN GONE SO LONG. I AM SHOCKED THAT THIS REFLECTION COLUMN IS NOT FULL. GOD CHARLIE YOU WERE SO DIFFERENT THAN ANY OTHER COP. YOU WERE HARD AS NAILS, BUT YOU HELPED ANYONE AND EVERYONE. PEOPLE YOU ARRESTED YOU HELPED. AS A YOUNG KID I KNEW SOMETHING WAS DIFFERENT ABOUT YOU. YOU WERE A REAL TRUE MAN. CHARLIE GOD I MISS YOU BROTHER. I BET YOUR ON YOUR MOTOR AT THE PEARLY GATES. THANK YOU FOR BEING THE GOOD PERSON AND COP YOU WERE.RIP CHARLIE,AND GOD BLESS YOU.

BILL
RETIRED PUBLIC SAFETY

May 18, 2007

Charlie Bruce was assigned as my training officer in June of 1967, when I was first hired. He wasn't on a motor yet, and we worked all areas of the city, so that I could learn them all. Charlie was proud to be a Florida Cracker. He came from a hard working family, and had a lawn and landscaping business on the side. He worked out of a pickup truck, and sometimes I "moonlighted" working for him to pick up a few extra bucks to help support my family. It was gruelling trying to keep up with Charlie. Even though I was 10 years younger, he was one of the toughest guys I've ever known and could work me into the ground. We would take a truckload of yard debris to the dump and unload it by hand in the hot Florida sun. Charlie would laugh and say, "Some day I'm going to have a dump truck so we don't have to bust our butts like this." Well, the day came when he had at least two dump trucks, and I think it might have been three. His sons helped him with the business, and it was successful. He became a motorman and a skilled rider. He survived two serious accidents by laying the motor down and rolling, one of them at high speed on traffic jammed I-95. The last one was the one he couldn't get himself out of. Some pinhead changed lanes into his path on A1A on Fort Lauderdale Beach. Charlie suffered a broken leg, and we figured, tough as he was, that was nothing, Charlie would be back in no time gunning his motor into the wind. He died a week later of an embolism, in a hospital bed.
You taught me what I needed to know to survive, my brother. I'll never forget you.

Captain James T. Farley, Retired
FLPD, Retired

February 2, 2007

ITS SOUNDS LIKE THUNDER FAR AWAY...

It sounds like thunder far away, but the skies are blue and bright...
And soon they crest the hill nearby, and ride into our sight.
They shake the ground with powerful sound, and they make some hearts beat fast...
They look so proud and noble, like Knights come from the past.

Side by side, they always ride, and seem to move as one...
From early in the morning light, to the setting of the sun.
And children point and wave to them, from cars that pass them by...
And young ones ask their parents, why the men have mirrors for eyes.

They ride the roads, and fight for good, and defend small ones like you...
They ask to ride, and do with pride, and sometimes they are few.
Like men of steel, on Silver Wings, they sparkle in the light...
then with a roar and rumble, they ride out of our sight.

Sometimes when one has fallen, never to ride again...
You can hear the others calling, like thunder on the wind.
Side by side, they slowly ride, and their thunder is a mournful sound...
And the mirrors hide their eyes from us, when teardrops fall to ground.

So if you see one riding, and you look into his face...
You see your reflection in his eyes, you know that you are safe.
For motormen are a special breed, they love to ride the wind...
And when you hear the thunder boom, the fallen ones ride again.

By

Author Unknown

Rest in Peace, Brother…
“Former Motorman”

Corporal Gregory A. Cohn
Florida Highway Patrol - St. Augustine

September 8, 2006

Rest in Peace Motorman. You are not forgotten.

Motor Officer D.Johnson
Metro Nashville Police Dept.

August 24, 2006

Motorman, Thank you for your service. You will never be forgotten. Rest well.

Senior Motor Officer M. Thurmond
MPD

August 24, 2006

Rest in peace

Det. A. Johnson
FLPD

February 17, 2006

geat man that left behined a good family

Robert Richmond

September 27, 2004

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