Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Narcotics Inspector Spencer Stafford

United States Department of the Treasury - Bureau of Narcotics, U.S. Government

End of Watch Thursday, February 7, 1935

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Reflections for Narcotics Inspector Spencer Stafford

Rest in peace Narcotics Inspector Stafford. Just terrible to murder a brother colleague. Their values belong, you know where!

Rabbi Lewis S. Davis

April 20, 2019

Inspector Stafford was accompanied to Post by longtime Dallas-based Bureau of Narcotics Agent Van C. McCullough.

John McDonald

February 26, 2018

Looking for Mr. Staffords partner in this specific incident

Mike Murphy

October 19, 2016

RIP Agent Stafford.

David Wales

David Wales
Private citizen

February 23, 2012

Your heroism and service is honored today, the 77th anniversary of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Time never diminishes respect and you will always be honored and revered.

Rest In Peace.

Phyllis Loya
Mom of fallen California Officer Larry Lasater, Pittsburg PD, eow 4/24/05

February 7, 2012

I hope your killer paid with his life. You are remembered today.

Constable Amanda Pandolfi
York Regional Police, Ontario Canada

February 7, 2011

36 at the time of his death, Narcotic Inspector Spencer Stafford of the Bureau of Narcotics, U.S. Department of Treasury, was shot and killed on February 7, 1935, in Post, Texas. Inspector Stafford was fatally wounded when Sheriff W. F. Cato fired at him with a machine gun as he exited a veterinary hospital. Charged with the murder were the Sheriff; his Deputy, Tom Morgan; and two local doctors, L. W. Kitchen, a veterinarian and V. A. Hartman, a physician. In addition, both doctors were charged with Federal narcotics violations.

Inspector Stafford, originally from Hudson, New York, joined the Internal Revenue Service's Narcotics Bureau after graduating from pharmacy school. At the time of his death, he had been assigned to the Fort Worth, Texas, office for three years. His previous assignments included tours in offices in New York, Georgia, and Florida. Inspector Stafford was described by the Dallas District Attorney, Clyde O. Eastus as, "one of the best officers I ever knew." Inspector Stafford's killers were charged under a statute enacted in May 1934, making it a Federal offense to kill a Federal officer in the line of duty. This was believed to be the first time this statute was invoked. Inspector Stafford was survived by his wife, C. M. Stafford, who was described as his high school sweetheart; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Stafford; and a brother, Leveret Stafford.

RIP ,you will not be forgotten.

Simon E

November 1, 2008

RIP.You will never be forgotten.

Anonymous

November 1, 2008

YOU ARE REMEMBERED TODAY AND THANK YOU SIR FOR YOUR SERVICE, YOU ARE A HERO JUST BY THE PROFESSION YOU CHOSE.

ALSO THANK YOU TO THE DEA AGENT WHO RESEARCHED THIS CASE. WITHOUT THE RESEARCH IT WOULD APPEAR THAT INSPECTOR STAFFORD HAD NO JUSTICE SERVED ON HIS BEHALF, HOWEVER, GOD HAS A WAY OF FIXING THOSE THINGS. IT IS A HORRIBLE STORY FOR ALL INVOLVED.

Pat Van Den Berghe
Neighbors for a Better Manchester, NH

February 5, 2008

Researched some facts and even have visited Post, TX, where the shooting took place. Stafford was a brave man to be doing the investigation in rural Texas during the 30's. He did his job well. It was an unforunate incident that not only affected him and his family, but the other particpants. Different reports indicate that Sheriff Cato of Garza County, may have thought Stafford was a bank robber. Nonetheless, Sheriff Cato ended up taking his own life leaving five children. A deputy sheriff involved in the incident also took his his life and so did a nurse who was a suspect in the invesitgation. It was tragedy. Even though it's more than 70 years since that incident, we must continue to remeber heroes like Stafford

S/A JD
DEA

March 3, 2007

The policeman stood and faced God,
Which must always come to pass.
He hoped his shoes were shining,
Just as brightly as his brass.

"Step forward now, policeman.
How shall I deal with you?
Have you always turned the other cheek?
To my church have you been true?"

The policeman squared his shoulders and said,
"No lord, I guess I ain't,
Because those of us who carry a badge
can't always be a saint."

I've had to work most Sundays,
and at times my talk was rough,
and sometimes I've been violent,
Because the streets are awfully tough.

But I never took a penny,
That wasn't mine to keep
Though I worked a lot of overtime
When the bills got just too steep.

And I never passed a cry for help,
Though at time I shook with fear.
And sometimes, God forgive me,
I've wept unmanly tears.

I know I don't deserve a place
Among the people here.
They never wanted me around
Except to calm their fear.

If you've a place for me here, Lord,
It needn't be so grand.
I never expected or had too much,
But if you don't I'll understand.

There was a silence all around the throne
Where the saints had often trod.
As the policeman waited quietly,
For the judgement of his god.

"Step forward now, policeman,
You've born your burdens well.
Come walk a beat on Heaven's streets,
You've done your time in hell"

GREGG HOUSTON
SOUTH CAROLINA

November 4, 2004

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SACRAFICE,
GOD BLESS YOU.

TMP

June 9, 2004

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