Family, Friends & Fellow Officers Remember...

Patrolman Francis V. Quinn

Lynn Police Department, Massachusetts

End of Watch Thursday, February 16, 1933

Leave a Reflection

Reflections for Patrolman Francis V. Quinn

Was thinking about you, after the recent police shootings in NYC and how those family's lives will be forever changed.

We will never know how ours' were changed by your death. I do remember Aunt Ella, last seeing her when I was on leave from the Army in the mid 70's. Sadly to a child, no one was able to explain how she was related to your sisters that made sense without explaining that there were people who would harm others.

You were my father's uncle and my grandmother's older brother. You were only mentioned in whispers during my youth and nothing was ever said about the way you died; just how.

My father did go on to become a Lynn police officer mentioning you were one of the reasons he did so.

Jim Tirabassi
Grand nephew

December 28, 2014

What a beautiful tribute Phyllis from someone who has suffered so much. Francis was my paternal grandfather's cousin. The story goes that his last words were- as above- to think of his family; his last actions were as a policeman where he wrote the suspects' car license plate number with his blood on the sidewalk. He, like your husband were heroes who will always be remembered. The Lynn police Department is now on the same street Francis Quinn was shot and there is a massive cemetary police grave stone in his memory and othe fallen Lynn policemen. Though my brother and I had planned to place flowers -Feb 16 this year on his 79th anniversay- at the site of his death, at the Lynn Police headquarters and at the gravestone Lord willing we will do so next year.
Your Larry will be remembered always.
God bless you.

(My sons are detectives and I pray for their safety at daily mass.)

Sue Sheehan, relative
Sue Sheehan, a distant relative

June 21, 2012

I am privileged to be among the first to leave a reflection Your heroism and service is honored today, the 79th anniversary of your death. Your memory lives and you continue to inspire. Thank you for your service. My cherished son Larry Lasater was a fellow police officer murdered in the line of duty on April 24, 2005 while serving as a Pittsburg, CA police officer.

Time never diminishes respect and your memory will always be honored and revered. Unfortunatley, since your murder and plea for your life to be spared, I have heard and seen recordings that depict officers also making the same plea before being murdered.

Rest In Peace

Phyllis Loya
Mom of fallen California Officer Larry Lasater, Pittsburg PD, eow 4/24/05

February 16, 2012

Patrolman Quinn, yesterday marked the 75th anniversary of your murder. You put forth the effort to protect the City of Lynn and for that, you are a hero. The acts of that day are testament to the fact that, one never knows what action might be his/her last and we cannot predict what each day might bring. It is truly touching that you thought of your family above all else.

I only hope that those responsible actually served their full sentences.

God Bless and may you continue to Rest in Peace, Brother.

Ptl. Jim Leahy, Jr.
Harvard University Police Dept.

February 17, 2008

Patrolman Quinn,
On today, the 75th anniversary of your murder, I would just like to say thank you for your service and sacrifice for the citizens of Lynn.

R.I.P.
Anonymous

Anonymous

February 16, 2008

YOU ARE REMEMBERED TODAY AND THANK YOU SIR FOR YOUR DEDICATION AND SERVICE. YOU ARE A HERO JUST BY THE PROFESSION YOU CHOSE. PLEASE KEEP WATCH OVER ALL OUR LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS IF YOU CAN. THERE ARE WAY TO MANY ON THIS WEB SITE. MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND ALL THOSE THAT LOVE YOU.
I HOPE THAT ALL THESE REFLECTIONS LEFT FOR YOU EASE THE PAIN OF YOU FAMILY, KNOWING, THAT YOUR BRAVERY, COURAGE AND RESPECT ARE APPRECIATED AND ACKNOWLEDGED BY ALL OF US HOW THANK YOU FOR DOING ALL THAT YOU COULD.

VANDENBERGHE
MANCHESTER, NH

February 10, 2008

PRIDE INTEGIRTY & GUTS !

Some of you may know my face, but not my name. Most of you have seen me around the city and some have even met me, but not always under the best of circumstances. Some of you have even spoken to me on the phone, when you called me while I was working.

Most of you have an opinion on how my job should be done, but would never take my job if it was the last one on earth. And some of you who don’t even know me, hate me because of my job. But when I go to my job, I go to make a difference and so I can fight what everyone else fears.

When most would be running away from danger, my job requires me to run towards it. I do this in the hopes of making a difference for someone else I don’t even know. Most people say I make too much money, because my pay is published in the newspaper. But don’t think twice about hearing about another sports player sign a 20 million dollar contract for 6 months a year of playing a “game.”

Since my job’s base pay isn’t the best I must work extra to pay the bills. Including working extra shifts, on holidays and pick up side work at construction sites as well on my days off, most still complain thinking I am greedy, but don’t they realize that I to must pay taxes, have a mortgage car payments and kids in collage as well?

Don’t they understand that I am not paid for what I do, but for what I am willing to do for them? After all how can you properly compensate someone to risk their own life and face danger everyday they go to work?

And when I go to work I am punched, kicked, spit on and called every name in the book for doing my job. And every night I leave my house to go to work I realize I may not come back home in the morning. Because when I go to work I can be stabbed, shot, drown, fall, be electrocuted, or die in a car accident rushing to help you.

My job also requires me to carry special “tools” to help me do my job. Sometimes even while doing my job I have to defend myself from someone attacking me. Although, the newspapers will report to you that I “beat someone down”, and not that I defended myself from an attack.

While at work I must also carry a gun to protect you, but should I have to use it, the media reports to you that I “gunned someone down” or that I “shot and killed” somebody, not that I defended myself. Don’t they realize that I shoot to live and never to kill?

Also when I go to work I wrap a protective vest around me to help keep me safe through my shift. I use this vest so that I will be allowed to live to the end of my work day. And hope and pray that should something bad happen that this vest helps keep me alive so that I will be allowed to see my children grow.

When I go to my job, I will see more pain, sorrow, agony, death and destruction in one month than most of you will see in an entire lifetime.


And to the ones who don’t know me, I unforunetly will meet most of you at the worst times in your life. You often will call me to come help you out with a problem. But if you have a really big problem you can get me at a special 3 digit number and me and my coworkers will race to your house, just to help you no questions asked. All you have to do is call and we will be there for you, no matter what time, day, night or holiday, rain shine or blizzard.

Sometimes my job also requires me to deliver lectures, babies and even bad news. I am also the one required to ring your doorbell in the middle of the night, swallow hard and advise you that a loved one will not be coming home tonight, then I spend the rest of my shift wondering why I ever took such a job.

Some people even refer to me as a “pig,” but when I hear that word called to me or one of my coworkers I think of Pride, Integrity and Guts, which everyone in my profession needs to do this job.

Me and my coworkers must be able to have muscles of steel, have a sense of humor and put ourselves into dangerous situations and face danger head on all in a days work.

We must act in a second and make a decision in the blink of an eye, and spend the rest of our life hoping we made the right choice in that split second. If not we can be arrested and charged with breaking a law, be sued for violating someone’s rights, or end up with even a worse fate.

My job requires me to take an oath to be their and to risk my life to protect you. And it is an oath that me and my fellow coworkers have taken and is one that we will never break.

What, you ask is my job? I am your local police officer. And what do I ask in return of doing all this and risking my life for you? Nothing at all, because it is my job and my hope of being the one who makes the difference.


- Paul Cotter, Lynn Mass

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This article was written by me for a local newspaper to remember our fallen brother and sisters during national police week.

it was later re-published in 4 more newspapers and one national police magazine.

Officer Quinn, sir you are in my thoughts and prayers. God bless you!

Ofc. Paul Cotter
Lynn (MA) PD

February 6, 2006

God Bless you. Watch over my brother for me.

Michelle Rogers
Sister of Sgt. J. Dragus EOW 10/20/05

Michelle Dragus-Rogers

November 11, 2005

Sad that no ones knows the details of your death. But it doesn't lessen your sacrifice.

May 24, 2005

MY BROTHER, MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND MAY YOU REST IN PEACE. A HERO FOR SURE. YOU SERVED WELL.

CHIEF RONNIE WATFORD-RET.
JEFFERSON POLICE DEPT,S.C.

October 29, 2004

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